Cass Ingram, D.O.

March 21/2020

There’s a great power to taking, aggressively, spices and their extracts for overall immune health. In these challenging times in order to survive exceptionally dramatic, heavy action is required. This aggressiveness can be descriptively described as “pounding.” In particular, this applies to supplements made from spices or spice-like plants.

Spices contain germicidal compounds. This is why they rarely visibly mold or rot. Think about the spice cupboard. The contents, powders or crumbled leaves, may remain in their containers indefinitely. Germs don’t like them nor do bugs.

Yet, it is difficult to get sufficient doses from mere culinary spices alone. Regardless, it is the natively grown plants or those growing in the wild that offer the greatest power. This includes the capacity to kill germs. That capacity is best found in the spice oil extracts such as oils of oregano, cumin, sage, garlic, and cinnamon.

There is historical evidence for this approach. Consider American’s 1918-era cinnamon grinders laborers. Through this work these men became saturated with the dust of this spice, entering also their bronchial tracts and lungs. With no OSHA available at the time there was a benefit to this. The workers were immunized from the flu-like plague at the time. Astoundingly, there were other beneficiaries: their family members. Through the spice dust they transported home in their clothes, the protected these household members, who also appeared to be free of the disease.

Can modern humans achieve such a saturation? It certainly seems plausible. Through supplement form and also misting sprays the individual could become saturated with spice essences. Yet, is it just cinnamon that offers such powers? Actually, through work at Georgetown University several spices were found, that is according to their germ-killing powers. After studying some 2o different extracts it was found that the following offered the most universal germicidal potency:

Lesser but still potent antiseptics included in the study were oils of wild myrtle, oil of wild lavender, oil of allspice, and lemongrass oil. Tests were conducted against disease-causing bacteria and fungi. All spice oils showed destructive powers against the pathogens. This is critical information. To know precisely which spices are the most powerful in the fight against germs could prove life-saving.

Think about the value. There are dozens of species of germs which are resistant to all known drugs. For still others, like viruses, there are no medical treatments. Simple spice oils, essentially, the medicines of God’s kingdom: are these the only hope for saving and preserving humankind?

Spice oils are not only germicides, but they are vigorously antiviral. It has been shown that they are capable of virtually dissolving viruses, shattering them. In all viral illnesses they should be consumed as an adjunct to medical treatment. Yet, it should be kept in mind that there is no medical therapy for viral overload, especially the raging viral infections such as those seen in flu and Epstein-Barr syndrome as well as cold-like syndromes from coronaviruses.

Today, a number of highly popular supplements are made from various spices. While these oils do possess potent germ-killed properties they are of no harm to human tissues. What’s more, they tend to be more aggressive against disease causing germs than the healthy, probiotics, which are largely tolerated to the food-based chemicals found in these powerful oils. The most useful of all is oil of wild oregano. ‘Wild’ is emphasized, because this was the type researched at Georgetown University, plus the oil extracted from wild plants is more reliable in potency than mere farm-raised. Regardless, oil of wild oregano has been the subject of a wide range of scientific studies, as has been its active ingredient, carvacrol. Studies have shown that both oregano oil and carvacrol are active against an entire gamut of germs: bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and viruses. Top quality wild oregano is made from truly wild oregano growing high in the mountains of the Mediterranean. It is such a vigorous plant that it actually grows on rock, the calcareous type, digesting it as fuel.

Nevertheless, it should be kept in mind that oregano is a mere food. Therefore, they it can be consumed with impunity. The spice oil is also simply a food, while an extract. There is no harm in taking it vigorously,  if needed.

Let us say a person requires immune support and does so significantly. Perhaps, a small amount is not sensible, like three to five drops daily. It may be necessary to take far more than this, like 10 drops to 40 drops at a time. If it is truly wild oregano oil—not an imitation with synthetic ingredients—there is never an issue. For instance, let us say a person needs cold support. Instead of just taking two or three drops it might be necessary to take five to 10 drops or more at a time, every hour, even every half hour. It can even be taken every few minutes, usually with food or juice.

Wild oregano oil may also be rubbed on the  feet and shins. It can also be applied and rubbed up-and-down the spine. When seriously needed, this may be done repeatedly.

Wild oregano oil can prove lifesaving. It is a potent aromatic oil of value to all people. If of the highest quality, whether as the oil, the ideal type, or gelcaps it can be taken as aggressively as necessary. When such support is no longer needed, it can be consume for maintenance. Plus, in general, it can be taken on a daily basis, again for protection. Increasing the consumption of wild oregano can prove valuable, again, based upon the quality of the spice. Pure, whole food wild oregano, combined with the associated spice Rhus coriaria, can be found in sprinkler and capsule form. Other potent supplements based on spice oil technology include multiple spice oil supplements with cumin, bay leaf, sage, cinnamon, and oregano and multiple spice oil sprays for cleansing the air. Consume wild oregano and other spices for your better health, both as food and medicine. Increase the intake of garlic, oregano, sage, cumin, and cinnamon. In particular, take the supplements as aggressively as necessary, being not afraid or concerned it the least, if “pounding them down” and taking repeated doses is necessary. This is especially true of the oil of wild oregano, the king of all herbs.

 

Sources:

Ingram, C. 2017. The Cure is in the Cupboard. Lake Forest, IL: Knowledge House Publishers.

Ingram, C. 2019. Doctor’s Guide to Oil of Oregano: 101 Uses. Lake Forest, IL: Knowledge House Publishers.

https://holisticprimarycare.net/topics/topics-h-n/infectious-disease/117-oregano-oil-proves-effective-against-coronavirus.html