Cass Ingram

Find out if you have the Vitamin D Blues? Find out if you have the Vitamin D Blues?
Do you have the Vitamin D Blues? In the book Nutrition Tests for Better Health the following key nutritional deficiency test is found. It is... Find out if you have the Vitamin D Blues?

Do you have the Vitamin D Blues?

In the book Nutrition Tests for Better Health the following key nutritional deficiency test is found. It is in regard to vitamin D deficiency, one that worsens at the changes of seasons, especially during the fall and winter.

Vitamin D deficiency is widespread, especially in Northern Hemipshere. It is also an issue for people who are house-bound, those who are chronically ill, people with kidney disorders, and those who are excessively clothed where the sunlight never or rarely strikes the skin.

The elderly are the most vulnerable to developing the deficiency. As described in Alive Magazine a study performed in a Massachusetts Hospital determined that nearly 6 of 10 patients suffered from some degree of the deficiency. Dr. J. E. Compston, writing in the British Medical Journal (November, 1998), notes that the current recommendation for vitamin D is far too low. Says Compton, the individual must consume a minimum of 800 I. U. daily, twice the recommended amount, to ward of serious disease. However, certain illnesses greatly compromise vitamin D absorption or utilization, particularly, as mentioned, kidney disease, liver disorders, celiac disease, and malabsorption. Additionally, the immune system and nervous system go into a decline in the event of vitamin D deficiency, increasing the vulnerability to infectious diseases and also mood disorders.

Definition
Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin essential for the function of every cell in the body. It is a unique vitamin, because it is procured in two ways: through food and through exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D acts directly upon the nuclear material, acting similar to a hormone. In fact, because of its biochemical actions this substance acts more like a hormone than a vitamin. This is to such a degree that it should be renamed “hormone D” or “internal skin/tissue bone-regenerating hormone D.”

Take this test to see if you are deficient, each question being worth one point unless indicated otherwise:

Symptoms, signs, questions
1. insomnia
2. irritability
3. spastic muscles
4. rapid heartbeat and/or irregular heartbeat
5. nosebleeds
6. easy bruising
7. twitching of the muscles
8. eyelid twitching
9. nearsightedness
10. chronic diarrhea
11. bone pain, especially in the legs
12. chronic upper, mid, or lower back pain
13. aching in the teeth
14. loose teeth
15. receding gums
16. brittle teeth (add 2 points)
17. brittle nails
18. frequent fractures (add 2 points)
19. cataracts
20. acne
21. pityriasis/itching, scaly skin condition, self resolving in 6-10 weeks/
22. premature graying of the hair
23. scoliosis
24. muscular rigidity
25. muscle cramps or spasms
26. convulsions and/or seizures
27. vague joint pain
28. soft teeth and/or tooth decay
29. delayed wound healing
30. chipping and/or cracking of the teeth
31. bruxism (grinding of the teeth)
32. bunion formation
33. protuberance of the forehead and/or bulging forehead
34. tendency to toss and turn while sleeping
35. Do you eat mostly raw food?
36. Do you live in the inner city of a major metropolis?
37. Do you use excessive amounts of sunscreen?
38. Are you housebound or office-bound during the day?
39. Do you suffer from chronic prostatitis?
40. Do you suffer from arthritis?
41. Is your arthritis severe and/or in several joints?
42. Do you have eczema and/or psoriasis?
43. Are you developing or have you developed deformed feet, hands, or wrists?
44. Do you avoid eating fatty fish such as salmon, albacore tuna, halibut, mackerel, sardines, and herring?
45. Do you avoid milk products because of allergy or other reasons?
46. Do you have mitral valve prolapse and/or heart arrhythmia?
47. Do you have colon cancer, or do you have a significant family history of colon cancer?
48. Do you have unusually large or box-shaped knee bones?
49. In the region where you live, do you only rarely have clear skies and sunshine?
50. Do you have colon polyps, or do you have a significant family history of colon polyps?
51. Do you get little or no sunlight and/or make no regular effort to get it (add 2 points)?
52. Are you undergoing chemotherapy treatments?
53. Do you have hepatitis, cirrhosis, or liver cancer?
54. Do you suffer from pancreatic disease?
55. Do you take Dilantin, Tegretol, or phenobarbital (epilepsy drugs) on a daily basis?
56. Do you use tanning salons frequently?
57. Are your knees deformed or are you bowlegged?
58. Do you have a history of excessive blood levels of calcium?
59. Do you have a low serum level of phosphorus?
60. Do you strictly adhere to a low fat diet?
61. Do you have a history of duodenal ulcer, or has your duodenum been removed?
62. Do you take Tagamet, Zantac, Pepcid, or similar H-2 blocking drugs on a regular basis?
63. Do you take aluminum containing antacids on a daily or weekly basis?
64. Do you have celiac disease and/or gluten intolerance?
65. Do you suffer from muscular weakness?
66. Do you have difficulty walking or climbing stairs?
67. Do you have congestive heart failure or enlarged heart?
68. Do you have gallstones, or have you had them previously?
69. Do you suffer from chronic kidney disease?
70. Is your cholesterol level below 155 mg/dl?
71. Have you been diagnosed with Osgood-Schlatter disease?
72. Do you have bone cancer?
73. Are you taking Ritalin?
74. Are you taking epilepsy medications?
75. Do you adhere to a strict macrobiotic diet (add 2 points)?
76. Do you have a concave (“pigeon”) breast?
77. Do you have breast cancer?
78. Do you have a dark complexion, though living in a northern climate (add 2 points)?
79. Are you taking diuretic medicines?
80. Do you live in a region of high smog?
81. Are you a female over 60 years of age (add 2 points)?
82. Do you have a history of bone cancer?
83. Are you a nursing home resident?
84. Have you been diagnosed with hyperparathyroidism?
85. Have you had your gallbladder removed?
86. Do you have chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis of the liver?
87. Do you eat mostly soy as your source of protein?
88. Are you a vegetarian (add 2 points)?
89. Are you a vegan (add 3 points)
90. Do you suffer from repeated kidney infections?
91. discoloration or grey coloration of the teeth

92. wear clothing covering up body in spring and summer with little flesh showing

93. Do you take no supplemental vitamin D-rich superfoods that contain the natural source vitamin like mushroom concentrates, fatty salmon oil containing natural vitamins A and D, and vitamin D-rich natural, unprocessed cod liver oil?

94. Are you on a strict diet that causes you to avoid all milk products, including butter, cheese, and whole fat milk?


1 to 4: Possible but likely vitamin D deficiency:

Vitamin D is not truly a vitamin but is, instead, a hormone. Vitamins act as coenzymes, while vitamin D acts directly upon the cell nucleus. It can be synthesized in the body, specifically on or within the skin, through the action of ultraviolet light. The light from the sun strikes the skin, which contains natural steroids. The steroids are converted to vitamin D (or its precursors). This “human-made” vitamin D enters the bloodstream to be used by the various cells and organs. The vitamin D hormone can also be consumed from food. However, it is found in significant amounts only in animal food, although fermented vegetable products, like tempe, may contain small amounts. Mushrooms contain a vitamin D precursor, vitamin D-2. The best dietary sources include fatty fish, fish liver oils, fish liver paste; liver paste, organic calf/lamb liver, eggs, whole milk products, butter, and cheese.


5 to 8: Mild vitamin D deficiency:

Even a mild vitamin D deficiency leads to physiological damage. This substance is required for the absorption of calcium and phosphorus, without which human life is impossible. Calcium controls heart rate, muscle contraction, blood clotting, nerve impulses, hormone release, and bone/tooth formation. Phosphorus is also needed for bone/tooth formation and it is also crucial for energy production. Phosphorus is a key substance used as a buffering agent in the blood, in other words, it helps regulate the acid-base balance. Thus, vitamin D deficiency directly causes two mineral deficiencies: that of calcium and phosphorus. What’s more, a lack of the vitamin may also induce magnesium deficiency. It’s role in controlling these nutrients clearly indicates how critical this nutrient is.

Vitamin D controls the absorption and metabolism of several key nutrients. The specific functions of calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus are directly influenced by it. This is the only vitamin which directly controls the function of a large number of minerals. Thus, a lack of vitamin D impacts the function of virtually every organ in the body, particularly the bones, joints, teeth, muscles, and nervous system. The deficiency also negatively impacts the endocrine system. The secretion of numerous hormones is controlled by vitamin D itself and/or calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium, A lack of vitamin D may cause a significant reduction in the levels of these minerals and, thus, the hormones they control. The result may be widespread failure of endocrine function. This might be manifested by the development of diabetes, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, and/or adrenal failure. This is also why vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk for certain cancers of the hormone glands, like prostate and breast cancer. A lack of vitamin D is a major cause of osteoporosis. Not only does vitamin D control calcium absorption, but it also facilitates its delivery to the bone. Individuals living in northern climates who suffer from this condition are assuredly vitamin D deficient.

To correct the deficiency increase the consumption of vitamin D-rich foods. The best sources are organic liver, egg yolk, fatty fish, roe (fish eggs), fish liver paste, liver paste, whole milk products, whole milk cheese, and fish liver oils. Cod liver oil is the most ancient and reliable vitamin D tonic. Used since the 10th century or prior, this oil has been reliably taken to cure vitamin D deficiency symptoms and illnesses.

This is now largely unavailable, that is in the whole food form. An ideal alternative is fatty salmon oil made from the brain and eyes of wild sockeye salmon (known as PolarPower). Such wild salmon oil has the advantage over cod liver oil of being more stable, since it is a rich source of the reddish-pink antioxidant astaxanthin.

For adults, consume 2 teaspoonsful daily (or take 4 or more capsules daily); for children, consume 1/2 teaspoonful daily. Also, increase your exposure to sunlight; get regular sunlight exposure. Sunbathing is unnecessary and may prove harmful. Sun exposure need not include sunbathing; a 2 hour brisk walk on a sunny day provides sufficient exposure to generate vitamin D needs for perhaps several days. During the sunny season take brisk walks on a daily basis. The ideal hours for vitamin D sun exposure are between 9:00 A.M and 11:30 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. Avoid sun exposure during high noon. Note: even a modest amount of exposure helps provoke vitamin D synthesis in the skin, like 20 to 30 minutes on a warm summer day. The raw material for vitamin D synthesis is skin oils, that is skin steroids. The aggressive use of harsh soaps, especially lye-based soaps, may deplete these oils, leading to a vitamin D deficiency. Winter or fall sunshine is less effective, because of the angle of the solar rays in the atmosphere. During the winter be sure to consume vitamin D-rich foods on a daily basis, and take cod liver oil or vitamin A supplements regularly. Also, eat salmon, about a half pound weekly. If possible, opt for wild salmon, which is richer in the vitamin than farm-raised. Eat eggs, about 6 weekly. Also, eat sardines and/or herring, 3 to 6 cans weekly.


9 to 14: Moderate vitamin D deficiency:

Vitamin D is so crucial for the bones, joints, and teeth that even a modest deficiency will ultimately lead to a degeneration of these tissues.

Vitamin D controls the absorption and metabolism of several key nutrients. The functions of calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus are directly influenced by it. This is the only vitamin which directly controls the operations of a large number of minerals. Thus, a lack of vitamin D impacts the function of virtually every organ in the body, particularly the bones, joints, teeth, muscles, and nervous system. The deficiency also negatively impacts the endocrine system. The secretions of numerous hormones is controlled by vitamin D itself and/or calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium, A lack of vitamin D may cause a significant reduction in the levels of these minerals and, thus, the hormones they control. The result may be widespread failure of endocrine function. This might be manifested by the development of diabetes, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, and/or adrenal failure. This is also why vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increase risk for certain cancers of the hormone glands, like prostate and breast cancer.

To correct the deficiency increase the consumption of vitamin D-rich foods. The best sources are organic liver, egg yolk, fatty fish, roe (fish eggs), fish liver paste, liver paste, whole milk products, whole milk cheese, and fish liver oils. Cod liver oil is the most ancient and reliable vitamin D tonic. Used since the 10th century or prior, this oil has been reliably taken to cure vitamin D deficiency symptoms and illnesses.

This is now largely unavailable, that is in the whole food form. An ideal alternative is fatty salmon oil made from the brain and eyes of wild sockeye salmon (known as PolarPower). Such wild salmon oil has the advantage over cod liver oil of being more stable, since it is a rich source of the reddish-pink antioxidant astaxanthin.

For adults, consume 1 tablespoonful daily (or take 8 or more capsules daily); for children, consume 1 teaspoon daily. The above-mentioned amounts may be taken for 2 or 3 months. Then, take the same amount on an occasional basis, like twice per week. Also, increase your exposure to sunlight; get regular sunlight exposure. Sunbathing is unnecessary and may prove harmful. Sun exposure need not include sunbathing; a 2 hour brisk walk on a sunny day provides sufficient exposure to generate vitamin D needs for perhaps several days. During the sunny season take brisk walks on a daily basis. The ideal hours for vitamin D sun exposure are between 9:00 A.M and 11:30 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. Avoid sun exposure during high noon. Note: even a modest amount of exposure helps provoke vitamin D synthesis in the skin, like 20 to 30 minutes on a warm summer day. Winter or fall sunshine is less effective, because of the declining angle of the solar rays in the atmosphere. During the winter be sure to consume vitamin D-rich foods on a daily basis and take cod liver oil or vitamin A supplements on a daily basis. Also, eat salmon, about a pound weekly. If possible, opt for wild salmon, which is richer in the vitamin than farm-raised. Eat eggs, about 6 weekly. Also, eat sardines and/or herring, 5 or more cans weekly. Make a Vitamin D-rich Salmon Salad. Simply add to a bowl 2 cans of canned salmon. Mix in chopped celery, capers, diced radishes, and diced carrots. Add 3 or 4 hard boiled eggs, sliced. Sprinkle with spices of your choice. Douse with balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil and mix. Eat as much on a daily basis as desired. Also, take the whole, raw fresh-water cod liver paste and oil, one teaspoonsful daily.


15 to 24: Severe vitamin D deficiency:

Warning, a severe vitamin D deficiency will likely result in permanent tissue damage. Consume hefty portions of vitamin D-rich foods, particularly fish liver oils, fatty fish, vitamin D-fortified milk products, and eggs. There is no vitamin D in grains and beans; reduce the intake of these foods. Take also cod liver oil, about 1 tablespoon daily. Note that cod liver oil is vulnerable to becoming rancid, especially after opening. To prevent this add a few drops of natural antioxidant spice oils such as oils of rosemary, sage, and/or oregano. For instance, add 5 to 10 drops of an olive oil/rosemary oil emulsion for each 8 ounces of cod liver oil.

When vitamin D is severely lacking, calcium, as well as phosphorus, absorption in the gut comes to a halt. This creates a catastrophic imbalance in the body, with the bones and teeth losing large amounts of calcium. Thus, brittle bones, brittle teeth, or tooth decay will ultimately result. Calcium is leached from the bones/teeth, which are the calcium reservoir, because it serves essential functions in the cells and bloodstream. When calcium levels in the blood drop to critically low levels, the nervous system is unable to function properly. In fact, the nerves become tense, and this may lead to muscular tension, spasticity, and leg cramps. In the extreme the heart muscle may be affected, and this may result in angina or, perhaps, a heart attack.

Increase the consumption of vitamin D-rich foods, adding them to all meals. The best sources are organic liver, egg yolk, fatty fish, roe (fish eggs), fish liver paste, liver paste, whole milk products, whole milk cheese, and fish liver oils. Cod liver oil is the most ancient and reliable vitamin D tonic. Used since the 10th century or prior, this oil has been reliably taken to cure vitamin D deficiency symptoms and illnesses.

This is now largely unavailable, that is in the whole food form. An ideal alternative is fatty salmon oil made from the brain and eyes of wild sockeye salmon (known as PolarPower). Such wild salmon oil has the advantage over cod liver oil of being more stable, since it is a rich source of the reddish-pink antioxidant astaxanthin.

For adults, consume 1 to 2 tablespoonsful daily (or take 12 gelcaps or more daily); for children, consume 1 teaspoon daily. The above-mentioned amounts may be taken for 2 or 3 months. Then, take the same amount on an occasional basis, like twice per week. Also, increase your exposure to sunlight; get regular sunlight exposure. Sunbathing (nude, swimsuit-style) is unnecessary and may prove harmful. Sun exposure need not include sunbathing; a 2 hour brisk walk on a sunny day provides sufficient exposure to generate vitamin D needs for perhaps several days. During the sunny season take brisk walks on a daily basis. The ideal hours for vitamin D sun exposure are between 9:00 A.M and 11:30 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. Avoid sun exposure during high noon. Note: even a modest amount of exposure helps provoke vitamin D synthesis in the skin, like 20 to 30 minutes on a warm summer day. Winter or fall sunshine is less effective, because of the declining angle of the solar rays in the atmosphere. During the winter be sure to consume vitamin D-rich foods on a daily basis and take cod liver oil or vitamin A supplements on a daily basis. Also, eat salmon, a pound or more weekly. If possible, opt for wild salmon, which is richer in the vitamin than farm-raised. Eat eggs, about 12 weekly. Also, eat sardines and/or herring, 7 cans weekly. Make a vitamin D-rich salmon salad. Simply add to a bowel 2 cans of canned salmon. Mix in chopped celery, capers, diced radishes, and diced carrots. Add 3 or 4 hard boiled eggs, sliced. Sprinkle with spices of your choice. Douse with balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil and mix. Eat as much on a daily basis as desired. Organic liver is an excellent source of vitamin D. Eat 6 or more ounces three times weekly. Be sure to cook the liver gently and, ideally, eat it medium-rare. Also, take the whole, raw fresh-water cod liver paste and oil, one or more teaspoonsful daily.


25 and above: Extreme vitamin D deficiency:

Supreme warning, you are at a massive risk for osteoporosis and may suffer spontaneous bone fracture. The skeleton and teeth are likely already becoming porous. What’s more, prolonged vitamin D deficiency greatly increases the risks of a wide range of diseases, including high blood pressure, heart disease, arterial degeneration, colon cancer, and bone cancer. When vitamin D is severely lacking, calcium, as well as phosphorus, absorption in the gut comes to a halt. This creates a catastrophic imbalance in the body, with the bones and teeth losing large amounts of calcium. Thus, brittle bones or tooth decay will ultimately result.

Vitamin D deficiency is common in individuals with chronic digestive disorders, especially those suffering from pancreatic or liver disease. Bile, a secretion produced by the liver, is essential for its absorption. A lack of bile is common in hepatitis, pancreatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, and gallbladder disease. Individuals taking birth control pills, as well as those on a low fat diet, are often bile deficient. Cholesterol-lowering drugs may also induce an extreme deficiency. Another high risk group is people suffering from multiple food allergies, especially those with gluten intolerance and/or grain allergies. In these instances even if the vitamin D intake is normal, a deficiency may develop.

To correct the deficiency increase the consumption of vitamin D-rich foods. The best sources are organic liver, egg yolk, fatty fish, roe (fish eggs), fish liver paste, liver paste, whole milk products, whole milk cheese, and fish liver oils. Cod liver oil is the most ancient and reliable vitamin D tonic. Used since the 10th century or prior, this oil has been reliably taken to cure vitamin D deficiency symptoms and illnesses.

This is now largely unavailable, that is in the whole food form. An ideal alternative is fatty salmon oil made from the brain and eyes of wild sockeye salmon (known as PolarPower). Such wild salmon oil has the advantage over cod liver oil of being more stable, since it is a rich source of the reddish-pink antioxidant astaxanthin.

For adults, consume 2 or more tablespoonsful daily (or take 12 gelcaps or more daily); for children, consume 1 teaspoonful daily. The above-mentioned amounts may be taken for 2 or 3 months. Then, take the same amount on an occasional basis, like twice per week. Also, increase your exposure to sunlight; get regular sunlight exposure. Sunbathing is unnecessary and may prove harmful. Sun exposure need not include sunbathing; a 2 hour brisk walk on a sunny day provides sufficient exposure to generate vitamin D needs for perhaps several days. During the sunny season take brisk walks on a daily basis. The ideal hours for vitamin D sun exposure are between 9:00 A.M and 11:30 A.M. and 2:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. Avoid sun exposure during high noon. Note: even a modest amount of exposure helps provoke vitamin D synthesis in the skin, like 20 to 30 minutes on a warm summer day. Winter or fall sunshine is less effective, because of the declining angle of the solar rays in the atmosphere. During the winter be sure to consume vitamin D-rich foods on a daily basis and take cod liver oil or vitamin A supplements on a daily basis. Also, eat salmon, a pound or more weekly. If possible, opt for wild salmon, which is richer in the vitamin than farm-raised. Eat eggs, about 12 weekly. Also, eat sardines and/or herring, 7 cans weekly. Make a Vitamin D-rich Salmon Salad. Simply add to a bowl 2 cans of canned salmon. Mix in chopped celery, capers, diced radishes, and diced carrots. Add 3 or 4 hard boiled eggs, sliced. Sprinkle with spices of your choice. Douse with balsamic vinegar and extra virgin olive oil and mix. Eat as much on a daily basis as desired. Organic liver is an excellent source of vitamin D. Eat 8 or more ounces three times weekly. Be sure to cook the liver gently and, ideally, eat it medium-rare. Also, take the whole, raw fresh-water cod liver paste and oil, two teaspoonsful daily.

Look for Fatty Salmon oil or the Health Hunter Omega ADK found HERE on this website!

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Cass Ingram

Dr. Cass Ingram is a nutritional physician who received a B.S. in biology and chemistry from the University of Northern Iowa (1979) and a D.O. from the University of Osteopathic Medicine and Health Sciences in Des Moines, IA (1984). Dr. Ingram has since written over 20 books on natural healing. He has given answers and hope to millions through lectures on thousands of radio/TV shows. His research and writing have led to countless cures and discoveries. Dr. Cass Ingram presents 100's of health tips and insights in his many books on health, nutrition, and disease prevention. Dr. Ingram is one of North America's leading experts on the health benefits and disease fighting properties of wild medicinal spice extracts. A popular media personality, he has appeared on over 5,000 radio and TV shows. He now travels the world promoting perfect health – the natural way

  • Jacob

    May 16, 2017 #1 Author

    I have owned the book Nutrition Tests for Better Health for several years and think it’s great. Yesterday, though, for the first time I decided to recommend the website mentioned therein (nutritiontest.com) only to find that the domain is for sale! I thought, “Why would he stop the site?” Of course, I have no idea when it went offline. Either way, when I came to this page and saw the heading “Nutrition Tests” I thought, “Aha – herein I should find all the content the book says was on the old site.” Boy am I surprised to find only two articles / tests. This looks like a man who does not stand behind his previous work. Am I wrong?

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