The Lyme Disease Cure – New Book, Powerful Information

Note from the author: I contracted a terribly potentially deadly case of Lyme disease from a nymphal tick bite, possibly two such bites, in southern Wisconsin. Having no idea the tick had been on, it was only realized upon seeing a bullseye rash, a massive one on my back. I got rid of the miserable condition through the use of exclusively natural therapies, the super-strength form of oil of wild oregano, along with the dessicated multiple spice capsules and the wild oregano juice, being the mainstay of the therapy.
It was, ultimately, a blessing to get sick. Now, I know virtually all there is to know about obliterating this condition.
Here are a few words from my forthcoming book, The Lyme Disease Cure, which will be available, God willing, in March.
It bears repeating. When that aggregation of cases occurred in Lyme, Connecticut, the disease baffled physicians. None of the physicians who saw the cases pinned it on the actual cause, which is an infection from tick bites. This fact would tend to confirm Plum Island as the source of the epidemic versus a naturally occurring cause. No wonder the doctors were clueless. The constellation of symptoms of this condition had never before been seen. There had never been a cluster of such an outbreak previously, where children in particular were afflicted with a rheumatoid arthritis-like disease.
It all started out in a way, which became a classical case of epidemiological discovery. As described by D. R. Snydman in his essay, “Principles of Epidemiology,” which is actually a chapter in the book, Mechanisms of Microbial Disease, it all started out in the classical way of a disease unknown and/or newly discovered. This was when the Department of Health of Connecticut received “separate phone calls from two mothers living on rural roads in the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme.” What the mothers reported was dire, which was the fact that “several children in their households and the neighborhood had what appeared to be arthritis.” This, then, represents none other than hard proof of the fraud. It was a clear and categorical outbreak of a disease never before known.
Children do not suddenly develop arthritis primarily presenting as single joint disease: that is they never do so in pocket outbreaks. Furthermore, if there is the development of such a condition in a family, it afflicts only one child, not multiples of them. Even so, in the 1970s ticks along the East Coast didn’t suddenly and miraculously become so pathological. They were inoculated maliciously for this purpose, which was to transmit crippling diseases. While it might be difficult for some people to fathom there is seemingly no other possibility. Clearly, the Plum Island corrupt ones created this monster, possibly as a kind of weaponized syphilis. Of note, it should be realized that the latter also presents as acutely damaged and/or swollen single joint disease.
They were clearly under attack. These were previously normal children. Vital, healthy—and highly mobile—they suddenly become afflicted with crippling joint conditions? Moreover, it is the children, not the adults? Too, it happens to multiple children in the same household? Plus, these are virtually all families living in a rural setting near woods. Furthermore, there are dogs in association, plus the children have a history of playing in the woods. Moreover, it all occurs coincident with tick-vector research on that notorious island a mere 10 miles from Lyme.
The epidemiology leads not merely to tick bites but also to Plum Island as the source of the highly pathogenic—and pathological—germ. Despite this, to certain scientific minds it did seem sufficiently bizarre. Unlike the local physicians who had treated the cases, the epidemiologists working for the state decided that this was a novel condition. People had lived in that area for decades, and none of them developed any such condition, surely not the children. Therefore, they deemed, it warranted further investigation. The state looked in depth at the cluster of childhood cases. Here is what they found. In all cases there was arthritis, but it was not the standard kind seen in the elderly. This was, in fact, a bizarre type, which fits precisely the history and presentation of infective arthritis. Almost everyone presented, initially, with a single joint, which became unexplainably swollen. It was always a large joint, like a knee, ankle, elbow, shoulder, or other, just as in its sister disease syphilis.
The swelling largely incapacitated the victims and thus was a cause for alarm among the parents. Once again, this is the standard presentation for acute bacterial infection of the body. Other bacterial agents which present as single joint disease include gonococcal infection and relapsing spirochetal fever. It must be emphasized that this initial presentation of single joint arthritis was universal in all the victims. It cannot be described often enough. That’s because it is the key to the diagnosis of Lyme, then and now. In the original outbreak the single joint presentation put the investigators on the right track. It led to the consideration by the researchers of the existence of an infectious agent.
There was another common finding in many of the sufferers. This was a bizarre, never before experienced oval rash. The rash was of fairly large size. Sometimes, it would recur, either in the same place or elsewhere on the body. In some cases the rash disappeared completely. Such a large rash associated with single joint swelling and/or arthritis was clearly a new finding for East Coast physicians. They had no idea what they were dealing with and did not on their own determine the cause. This is not to say that infections tick-borne spirochetes had never occurred before. Yet, they had never occurred in such severity and/or in clustered outbreaks in children. The association of the disease with the activities on Plum Island is clear. Moreover, the biogerm worked just as advertised. It incapacitated its victims. Later, it would become known that in some cases it killed them.